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Press Release Archive

3 February 2014

Oxford University Press to publish Federation of European Microbiological Societies journals from 2015

Oxford University Press (OUP) is delighted to announce that on 30th January 2014 they signed a contract with the prestigious Federation of European Microbiological Societies (FEMS) to publish their five journals from 1st January 2015.




3 February 2014

Rheumatology appoints new editor

Rheumatology, the international, peer-reviewed scientific journal, has appointed a new editor. Professor Jacob van Laar will be taking over from the current editor Professor Robert Moots.




30 January 2014

Oxford University Press launches new journal: Oxford Medical Case Reports

Oxford University Press (OUP) is delighted to announce the launch of a new medical journal, Oxford Medical Case Reports (OMCR).




27 January 2014

Oxford University Press to Publish Medical Mycology with ISHAM Beginning in 2014

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce its new partnership with the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM). Beginning in January 2014, OUP and ISHAM will be working together to publish the journal Medical Mycology.




8 January 2014

Fit teenagers are less likely to have heart attacks in later life

Researchers in Sweden have found an association between a person’s fitness as a teenager and their risk of heart attack in later life. In a study of nearly 750,000 men, they found that the more aerobically fit men were in late adolescence, the less likely they were to have a heart attack 30 or 40 years later.




7 January 2014

Breastfeeding associated with lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis, according to new study

In a new study of over 7,000 older Chinese women published online today in the journal Rheumatology, breastfeeding – especially for a longer duration – is shown to be associated with a lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Specifically, it showed that women who had breastfed their children were around half as likely to have RA, compared to women who had never breastfed.




19 December 2013

Warfarin increases risk of stroke among atrial fibrillation patients in first 30 days of use

Patients with atrial fibrillation – an irregular and often abnormally fast heartbeat – have nearly double the risk of suffering a stroke in the first 30 days after starting to take the anti-clotting drug warfarin compared to non-users, according to a study of over 70,000 patients.




18 December 2013

Freezing semen doubles the chances of fatherhood for men after treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma

Men with Hodgkin lymphoma who want to become fathers after their cancer treatment have greatly increased chances of doing so if they have frozen and stored semen samples beforehand, according to research published online today (Wednesday) in Europe’s leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction.




17 December 2013

The Liverpool Care Pathway has been made a scapegoat, says palliative care consultant

“It is as illogical to discredit the LCP because of errant clinicians as it is to ban the Highway Code because of bad drivers.” Claud Regnard, FRCP, a palliative care consultant, has called the demise of the Liverpool Care Pathway a “tragedy” and compared it to banning the Highway Code because of bad drivers in a paper for the journal Age and Ageing, published online today (Tuesday).




6 December 2013

Feeding by tourists compromises health of already-endangered iguanas, study finds

Feeding wildlife is an increasingly common tourist activity, but a new study published online today by the journal Conservation Physiology shows that already-imperilled iguanas are suffering further physiological problems as a result of being fed by tourists.




2 December 2013

Delivery rates are unaffected by a policy of transferring fewer embryos coupled with reimbursing six cycles of fertility treatment

Research from Belgium, published in Human Reproduction, has shown that if governments legislate to restrict the numbers of embryos transferred during fertility treatment, but combine it with a policy of reimbursing six cycles of assisted reproduction technology (ART), there is no detrimental impact on pregnancy and delivery rates. However, there is a greatly reduced risk of multiple births, which have associated health risks for mother and babies and are an increased cost to the state.




28 November 2013

Untreated cancer pain a ‘scandal of global proportions,’ survey shows

A ground-breaking international collaborative survey, published today in Annals of Oncology, shows that more than half of the world’s population live in countries where regulations that aim to stem drug misuse leave cancer patients without access to opioid medicines for managing cancer pain.




22 November 2013

International Society for Biocuration names DATABASE: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation its official journal

DATABASE: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation, a leading scholarly journal in the field of computational and mathematical biology, has entered into a formal partnership with the International Society for Biocuration (ISB), becoming its official journal from today.




21 November 2013

Rotavirus Vaccination May also Protect Children Against Seizures

A new study suggests an additional—and somewhat surprising—potential benefit of vaccinating children against rotavirus, a common cause of diarrhea and vomiting. Besides protecting kids from intestinal illness caused by rotavirus, immunization may also reduce the risk of related seizures, according to findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases .




20 November 2013

Casual employment is linked to women being childless by the age of 35

Women who have worked in temporary jobs are less likely to have had their first child by the age of 35, according to research published online in Europe’s leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction. The study shows that the longer women spent in casual employment, the more likely they were to be childless when they were 35.




14 November 2013

Rapid Testing to Diagnose Influenza Leads to More Appropriate Care in the ED

When patients in the emergency department (ED) are diagnosed with influenza by means of a rapid test, they get fewer unnecessary antibiotics, are prescribed antiviral medications more frequently, and have fewer additional lab tests compared to patients diagnosed with influenza without testing, according to a new study. Published online in the Journal of the Pediatrics Infectious Diseases Society, the findings suggest that diagnosing influenza with a rapid diagnostic test leads to more appropriate, specific, and efficient care.




7 November 2013

Poultry Science Association joins Oxford Journals

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce its partnership with the Poultry Science Association (PSA) to exclusively publish their two journals, Poultry Science and The Journal of Applied Poultry Research.




1 November 2013

The Milky Way’s tilted dark matter halo

On the OUPblog, Victor P. Debattista discusses the latest research on the Milky Way:




31 October 2013

OUP to launch new open access journal, Journal of Law and the Biosciences, in 2014

Oxford University Press (OUP) is delighted to announce its partnership with Duke University, Harvard Law School, and Stanford University to launch a new open access journal in 2014: Journal of Law and the Biosciences (JLB).




30 October 2013

Teenagers and young adults diagnosed with cancer are at increased risk of suicide

Teenagers and young adults are at increased risk of suicide after being diagnosed with cancer according to a study published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology.




21 October 2013

Oxford University Press to Publish Journal of Music Therapy and Music Therapy Perspectives with AMTA Beginning in 2014


Oxford University Press is pleased to announce its new partnership with the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA). Beginning in 2014, OUP and AMTA will be working together to publish the Journal of Music Therapy and Music Therapy Perspectives.




15 October 2013

Only a minority of stroke victims are being seen by doctors within the recommended timeframe

In a study, published online today in the journal Age and Ageing, of over 270 patients newly diagnosed with minor strokes or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), only a minority sought medical help within the timeframe recommended by the Royal College of Physicians. This is despite the high profile FAST campaign, which was taking place at the time that the study was conducted.




30 September 2013

Survival after cancer diagnosis in Europe is strongly associated with how much governments spend on health care

The more an EU national government spends on health, the fewer the deaths after a cancer diagnosis in that country, according to new research presented to the 2013 European Cancer Congress and published simultaneously in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology.




19 September 2013

The demographic landscape on the OUPblog

If demography were a landscape, what would it look like? Every country has a different geographical shape and texture, visible at high relief, like an extra-terrestrial fingerprint. But what about the shape and texture revealed by the demographic records of the people who live and die on these tracts of land?




17 September 2013

ESMO announces new Editor-in-Chief of Annals of Oncology

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the leading European organisation representing medical oncology professionals, today announced that Professor Jean-Charles Soria, MD, PhD will be the new Editor-in-Chief of Annals of Oncology as of January 2014.




13 September 2013

The UK is not investing enough in research into multi-drug resistant infections, say researchers

Although emergence of antimicrobial resistance severely threatens our future ability to treat many infections, the UK infection-research spend targeting this important area is still unacceptably small, say a team of researchers led by Michael Head of UCL (University College London). Their study is published online today in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. This study is the first systematic analysis of research funding for infectious disease research, and for antimicrobial resistance, in the UK between 1997 and 2010.




12 September 2013

Dreaming is still possible even when the mind is blank

Isabelle Arnulf and colleagues from the Sleep Disorders Unit at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) have outlined case studies of patients with Auto-Activation Deficit who reported dreams when awakened from REM sleep – even when they demonstrated a mental blank during the daytime. This paper proves that even patients with Auto-Activation Disorder have the ability to dream.




11 September 2013

Oxford University Press to publish Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan from January 2014

Oxford University Press (OUP) and the Astronomical Society of Japan are delighted to announce a new publishing partnership for the journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan (PASJ). OUP will assume publication of PASJ from January 2014.




2 September 2013

New data reveals that the average height of European males has grown by 11cm in just over a century

The average height of European males increased by an unprecedented 11cm between the mid-nineteenth century and 1980, according to a new paper published online in the journal Oxford Economic Papers. Contrary to expectations, the study also reveals that average height actually accelerated in the period spanning the two World Wars and the Great Depression.




7 August 2013

Length of human pregnancies can vary naturally by as much as five weeks

The length of a human pregnancy can vary naturally by as much as five weeks, according to research published online in Europe’s leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction.




25 July 2013

Large study reveals increased cancer risks associated with family history of the disease

A family history of cancer increases the risk of other members of the family developing not only the same cancer (known as a concordant cancer) but also a different (discordant) cancer, according to a large study of 23,000 people in Italy and Switzerland.




17 July 2013

Study of over 73,000 patients with high blood pressure finds non-adherence to medication greatly increases risk of fatal and non-fatal strokes

People with high blood pressure, who don’t take their anti-hypertensive drug treatments when they should, have a greatly increased risk of suffering a stroke and dying from it compared to those who take their medication correctly.




12 July 2013

Brain region implicated in emotional disturbance in dementia patients

A study published in Brain is the first to demonstrate that patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) lose the emotional content/colour of their memories. These findings explain why FTD patients may not vividly remember an emotionally charged event like a wedding or funeral.




10 July 2013

Excessive cerebral spinal fluid and enlarged brain size in infancy are potential biomarkers for autism

Children who were later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder had excessive cerebrospinal fluid and enlarged brains in infancy, a study by a multidisciplinary team of researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found, raising the possibility that those brain anomalies may serve as potential biomarkers for the early identification of the neurodevelopmental disorder.




2 July 2013

Forcible feeding and the Cat and Mouse Act: one hundred years on

Between 1909 and 1914, imprisoned militant suffragettes undertook hunger strikes across Britain and Ireland. Public distaste for the practice of forcible feeding ultimately led to the passing of the Prisoners (Temporary Discharge for Ill Health) Act, or ‘the Cat and Mouse Act’ as it was more commonly known. We marked the 100th anniversary of this Act, passed so that prison medical officers could discharge hunger-striking suffragettes from prisons if they fell ill from hunger, on OUPblog with a post from Ian Miller. Miller recently wrote a paper on the same topic for the journal Social History of Medicine.




27 June 2013

People’s perception of the effect of stress on their health is linked to risk of heart attacks

People who believe that stress is having an adverse impact on their health are probably right, because they have an increased risk of suffering a heart attack, according to new research published online in the European Heart Journal.




26 June 2013

Death rates from heart disease continue to decline in most of the EU, but some countries are ‘cause for concern’

Death rates from heart disease in the European Union have more than halved in many countries since the early 1980s, according to new research published online today in the European Heart Journal. In the majority of countries, there have been ongoing steady reductions in heart disease death rates in both sexes and most age groups, including among younger people, despite increases in obesity and diabetes during this time. However, heart disease remains a leading cause of death in Europe.




24 June 2013

British Journal of Anaesthesia and British Pain Society publish two new BPS Pain Patient Pathways

In a new initiative the British Journal of Anaesthesia (BJA) has collaborated with the British Pain Society (BPS) to publish two of the new BPS Pain Patient Pathways.




12 June 2013

Long-distance cross-country skiers at increased risk of heart rhythm disturbances

Cross-country skiers who take part in one of the world’s most challenging ski races, the 90 km Vasaloppet in Sweden, are at increased risk of developing arrhythmia – problems with the rate or rhythm of their heart beat – according to a study of nearly 53,000 race participants published online today (Wednesday) in the European Heart Journal [1].




5 June 2013

Alzheimer’s disease drugs linked to reduced risk of heart attacks

Drugs that are used for treating Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages are linked to a reduced risk of heart attacks and death, according to a large study of over 7,000 people with Alzheimer’s disease in Sweden.




31 May 2013

World No Tobacco Day: How do we end tobacco promotion?

For the past 25 years, the World Health Organisation and its partners have marked World No Tobacco Day. This day provides an opportunity to assess the impact of the world’s leading cause of preventable death — responsible for one in ten deaths globally — and to advocate for effective action to end tobacco smoking. This year, the WHO has selected the theme of banning tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship.




23 May 2013

Calorie information in fast food restaurants used by 40 percent of 9-18 year olds when making food choices

A new study published online in the Journal of Public Health has found that of young people who visited fast food or chain restaurants in the U.S. in 2010, girls and youth who were obese were more likely to use calorie information given in the restaurants to inform their food choices. It also found that young people eating at fast food or chain restaurants twice a week or more were half as likely to use calorie information as those eating there once a week or less.




20 May 2013

Law, gerontology, and human rights: can we connect them all?

Historically, law was not generally considered an important part of gerontological science. The law was, at best, considered part of gerontology in that it played a part in the shaping of public policy towards the older population, or was incidental to ethical discussions connected with old age. At worst, gerontology has simply ignored those aspects of the law connected with the old, and kept lawyers out of its province.




15 May 2013

Slim women have a greater risk of developing endometriosis than obese women

Women with a lean body shape have a greater risk of developing endometriosis than women who are morbidly obese, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the link.




29 April 2013

A selection of the interviews for Cardiology 2013

What is the relationship between atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction? How do aldosterone blockers reduce mortality? What steps are doctors taking toward personalized cardiac medicine? What are the new drugs and devices to treat hypertension? What is salt’s role in the human diet? The international cardiology community examined these questions and more at the Cardiology Update 2013 in Davos, Switzerland earlier this year.




22 April 2013

Living alone and ‘bouncing back’ after bereavement

Is living alone in later life bad for your health? As we get older, the likelihood that we will be living on our own increases. We live in an ageing population and data from the Office for National Statistics show that in 2010, nearly half of people aged 75 and over were living on their own. On OUPblog, Juliet Stone discusses how some people 'bounce back' after bereavement.




18 April 2013

Famous performers and sportsmen tend to have shorter lives, new study reports

Fame and achievement in performance-related careers may be earned at the cost of a shorter life, according to a study published online today in QJM: An International Journal of Medicine.




4 April 2013

Oxford Journals compliant with Research Councils UK and Wellcome Trust open access policies

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce that from 1 April 2013 our journals will be compliant with the Research Councils UK (RCUK) and Wellcome Trust policies on open access (OA). OUP is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both ‘gold’ and ‘green’ open access publishing to support this mission. We are committed to working with our society partners to support sustainable OA for each community, and have consulted with each of our partners to decide on the best route to compliance for each journal.




13 March 2013

Fertility after ectopic pregnancy: first randomised trial finds reassuring evidence on the effect of different treatments

The first randomised trial to compare treatments for ectopic pregnancies has found no significant differences in subsequent fertility between medical treatment and conservative surgery on one hand, and conservative or radical surgery on the other.




12 March 2013

Men in same-sex marriages are living longer, according to new study

The mortality rate for men in same-sex marriages has dropped markedly since the 1990s, according to a Danish study published online today in the International Journal of Epidemiology. However, same-sex married women have emerged as the group of women with the highest, and in recent years, even further increasing mortality.




12 March 2013

New nationwide survey of UK anaesthetists suggests low rate of patient awareness during general anaesthesia

The Royal College of Anaesthetists (RCoA) and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) today publish initial findings from a major study which looked at how many patients experienced accidental awareness during general anaesthesia.




6 March 2013

Insomnia is linked to increased risk of heart failure

People who suffer from insomnia appear to have an increased risk of developing heart failure, according to the largest study to investigate the link.




27 February 2013

Muscle, skin and gastrointestinal problems cause a quarter of patients with heart disease and strokes to stop treatment in HPS2-THRIVE trial

The largest randomised study of the vitamin niacin in patients with occlusive arterial disease (narrowing of the arteries) has shown a significant increase in adverse side-effects when it is combined with statin treatment. Results from the HPS2-THRIVE study (Heart Protection Study 2 – Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events), including the reasons patients stopped the study treatment, are published in the European Heart Journal.




20 February 2013

Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased deaths after heart attacks

Air pollution contributes to an increased number of deaths among patients who have been admitted to hospital with heart attacks, according to a study published in the European Heart Journal.




19 February 2013

Phosphorus starvation linked to symptoms of citrus disease Huanglongbing in new study

The citrus disease Huanglongbing (HLB), meaning "yellow shoot disease" in Chinese and also called citrus greening in English-speaking countries, is the most destructive disease threatening the citrus industry worldwide. Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control it. A new study, published online in the journal Molecular Plant, profiled small Ribonucleic Acids (sRNAs) from both diseased and healthy plants and found that some of these tiny molecules could potentially be developed into early diagnosis markers for HLB. More importantly, the study demonstrates that the diseased trees suffered from severe phosphorus (P) deficiency and that application of phosphorus solutions to the diseased trees significantly alleviated HLB symptoms and thus improved fruit yield in a three-year field trial in southwest Florida.




15 February 2013

Study Suggests Link Between Untreated Depression and Response to Shingles Vaccine

Results from a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases suggest a link between untreated depression in older adults and decreased effectiveness of the herpes zoster, or shingles, vaccine. Older adults are known to be at risk for shingles, a painful condition caused by the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus, and more than a million new cases occur each year in the U.S. The vaccine boosts cell-mediated immunity to the virus and can decrease the incidence and severity of the condition.




14 February 2013

Oxford University Press to publish ILAR Journal with the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce its new partnership with the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR). Beginning in 2013, OUP and ILAR will be working together to publish ILAR Journal, a peer-reviewed, theme-oriented publication that provides timely information for all who use, care for, and oversee the use of animals in research. A top 10 journal in its field with a 2.33 2011 Impact Factor, ILAR Journal publishes selective original articles written by leading experts in the field that review research to promote the high-quality, humane care and use of animals and the appropriate consideration and use of alternatives.




13 February 2013

Lung cancer set to overtake breast cancer as the main cause of cancer deaths among European women

Lung cancer is likely to overtake breast cancer as the main cause of cancer death among European women by the middle of this decade, according to new research published in the cancer journal Annals of Oncology today. In the UK and Poland it has already overtaken breast cancer as the main cause of cancer deaths in women.




11 February 2013

Oxford University Press and BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT strengthen partnership

In an acquisition that builds on the publisher’s already strong relationship with BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, Oxford University Press (OUP) has announced the addition of Interacting with Computers (IwC) to its journal collection.




6 February 2013

Patients Can Emit Small, Influenza-Containing Particles Into the Air During Routine Care, Study Finds

A new study suggests that patients with influenza can emit small virus-containing particles into the surrounding air during routine patient care, potentially exposing health care providers to influenza. Published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, the findings raise the possibility that current influenza infection control recommendations may not always be adequate to protect providers from influenza during routine patient care in hospitals.




31 January 2013

New for 2013: Conservation Physiology: Mechanisms, Policy and Practice

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce the launch of Conservation Physiology, an open access journal, edited by a prestigious team of experts headed up by Steven Cooke, from Carleton University, Canada. Conservation Physiology is published on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology(SEB) which is committed to promote and increase the influence of Experimental Biology within the scientific community. Both OUP and the SEB recognised the expanding reader demand for research in the developing area of conservation physiology and hope this journal will serve as a home and rallying point for this rapidly emerging discipline. Publication fees will be waived for the launch period.




10 January 2013

Spin and bias in published studies of breast cancer trials

Spin and bias exist in a high proportion of published studies of the outcomes and adverse side-effects of phase III clinical trials of breast cancer treatments, according to new research published in the cancer journal Annals of Oncology today.




9 January 2013

Lung cancer patients live longer if they use beta-blockers while receiving radiotherapy

Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer survive longer if they are taking beta-blockers while receiving radiotherapy, according to a study of 722 patients published in the cancer journal Annals of Oncology today.




14 December 2012

HPV in older women may be due to reactivation of virus, not new infection

A new study suggests that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women at or after menopause may represent an infection acquired years ago, and that HPV infections may exist below limits of detection after one to two years, similar to other viruses, such as varicella zoster, which can cause shingles. The study, published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, highlights the need for additional research to better understand HPV infections and the role of HPV persistence and reactivation, particularly in women of the baby boomer generation.




6 December 2012

Children born after infertility treatment are more likely to suffer from asthma

Asthma is more common among children born after infertility treatment than among children who have been planned and conceived naturally, according to findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study published online in Europe's leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction.




5 December 2012

Semen concentration and quality fell in French men between 1989 and 2005

New research shows that the concentration of sperm in men's semen has been in steady decline between 1989 and 2005 in France. In addition, there has been a decrease in the number of normally formed sperm. The study is published in Europe's leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction. The study is important because, with over 26,600 men involved, it is probably the largest studied sample in the world.




29 November 2012

Findings support safety of whooping cough vaccine for older adults

A new study of the safety of the tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine supports the recommendation that people aged 65 and older get the vaccine to protect themselves and others, particularly young babies, from pertussis. Published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the findings come as reported US cases of the bacterial infection, also known as whooping cough, are at the highest level since the 1950s.




28 November 2012

Digoxin increases deaths in patients with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug that has been used worldwide for centuries to treat heart disease, is associated with a significant increase in deaths in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to results from a study in the European Heart Journal.




28 November 2012

‘Zombie drugs’

According to official statistics, a significant minority of people living with dementia are prescribed antipsychotic drugs for behavioural and psychological symptoms. What many perhaps don’t know is that only one antipsychotic (Risperidone) has actually been licensed for use in elderly people with dementia. The rest of these drugs are prescribed “off-label”. Dr Rosie Harding and Dr Elizabeth Peel make the argument for regulatory controls on the off-label prescription of pharmaceutical products in Medical Law Review and OUPblog.




21 November 2012

Nose cell transplant enables paralysed dogs to walk

Dogs that had suffered damage to their spinal cords resulting in paralysis of their hind legs are able to walk again after the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells from the lining of the nose to the spinal cord. This means that humans suffering paralysis after spinal injuries could be treated with the same technique, according to research published in the journal Brain.




20 November 2012

Object analysis of the giant pumpkin

While the giant pumpkin looks like a wonder of nature, it is just as much a product of history and culture, that is, as much an idea as a plant type. In Environmental History Cindy Ott provides an object analysis of the giant pumpkin, which she also discusses on OUPblog.




15 November 2012

Should fishing communities play a greater role in managing fisheries?

Marine fisheries around the world are in a state of decline. Each decade the UN Food and Agriculture Organization reports that a larger fraction of the world’s fisheries are overexploited or depleted. Historical trends in individual fisheries have led some scientists to predict all major fisheries will be collapsed by mid-century. In the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy Robert Deacon outlines how fishing communities and private fishermen's organizations can enhance fisheries management. He discusses his findings on OUPblog.




14 November 2012

Relatives of people who die suddenly from heart problems have greatly increased risk of cardiovascular disease

Relatives of young people who have died suddenly from a heart-related problem are at greatly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease according to a study published online today in the European Heart Journal.




8 November 2012

Human rights on steroids: Kony 2012 in review

In March 2012 an online video campaigning for the arrest of Joseph Kony, alleged Commander-in-Chief of the Lord’s Resistance Army, was launched by Invisible Children Inc. Within six days the video had been watched by over 100 million people. A few months on, the Journal of Human Rights Practice has released a collection of four reviews on the Kony 2012 video and campaign. On the OUPblog, Lucy Harding reflects on the Kony 2012 campaign.




7 November 2012

Mothers’ age at menopause may predict daughters’ ovarian reserve

A mother’s age at menopause may predict her daughter’s fertility in terms of the numbers of eggs remaining in her ovaries, according to the new research published online in Europe’s leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction.




24 October 2012

Acupuncture relieves symptoms of a dry mouth caused by radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

Patients who have received radiotherapy for head and neck cancer often suffer from the unpleasant and distressing side-effect of a dry mouth, caused by damage to their salivary glands from the radiation. A new study published in the journal Annals of Oncology has shown that acupuncture can relieve the symptoms of dry mouth (known as xerostomia).




22 October 2012

Nucleic Acids Research and Open Access

In 2004, the Executive Editors of Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) made the momentous decision to convert the journal from a traditional subscription based journal to one in which the content was freely available to everyone, with the costs of publication paid by the authors. On the OUPblog, Richard Roberts discusses the transition of Nucleic Acids Reasearch (NAR) to open access and some of the issues faced.




18 October 2012

Fit Firefighters

Firefighters are expected to maintain high levels of physical fitness in order to safely perform their required duties. However, many firefighters struggle to maintain fitness levels and have problems with being overweight or obese. New research from the journal Occupational Medicine examines the prevalence of obesity in firefighters and discusses the implications of their findings on the OUPBlog.




18 October 2012

Women whose first pregnancy was ectopic have fewer children and a high risk of another ectopic pregnancy

New research published in the journal of Human Reproduction, has found that women whose first pregnancy is ectopic are likely to have fewer children in the following 20-30 years than women whose first pregnancy ends in a delivery, miscarriage or abortion, according to results from a study of nearly 3,000 women in Denmark. In addition, these women have a five-fold increased risk of a subsequent ectopic pregnancy.




17 October 2012

Oxford University Press partners with the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce its partnership with the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law (UNIDROIT), for the publication of the Uniform Law Review.




16 October 2012

Great apes, small numbers: Genetic study reveals recent decline in endangered orangutan population, but offers hope for the future

New research published via the Journal of Heredity, via Advanced Access, has found that Sumatran orangutans have undergone a substantial recent population decline, but the same research revealed the existence of critical corridors for dispersal migrations that, if protected, can help maintain genetic diversity and aid in the species’ conservation.




1 October 2012

Oxford University Press launches London Review of International Law

Oxford University Press has announced its 2013 launch of a new journal, London Review of International Law, for critical, innovative, and cutting-edge scholarship on international law.




28 September 2012

Effective HIV Care Benefited All HIV Patients, Regardless of Demographics and Behavioral Risk

Improved treatment options, a multi-pronged treatment model, and federal funding from the Ryan White Program have helped an inner city Baltimore clinic improve outcomes for HIV patients across all groups, including those most often hardest hit by the disease. Published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the results from the 15-year analysis of patients at a clinic serving a primarily poor, African-American patient population with high rates of injection drug use demonstrate what state-of-the-art HIV care can achieve, given appropriate support.




26 September 2012

Inner City Infants Have Different Patterns of Viral Respiratory Illness than Infants in the Suburbs

Children living in low-income urban areas appear especially prone to developing asthma, possibly related to infections they acquire early in life. In a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, available online, researchers from the University of Wisconsin in Madison investigated viral respiratory illnesses and their possible role in the development of asthma in urban versus suburban babies. The differences in viral illness patterns they found provide insights that could help guide the development of new asthma treatments in children.




24 September 2012

Researchers find sudden cardiac death is associated with a thin placenta at birth

Researchers studying the origins of sudden cardiac death have found that in both men and women a thin placenta at birth was associated with sudden cardiac death. A thin placenta may result in a reduced flow of nutrients from the mother to the foetus. The authors suggest that sudden cardiac death may be initiated by impaired development of the autonomic nervous system in the womb, as a result of foetal malnutrition. The research was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.




21 September 2012

Oxford University Press launches Journal of Antitrust Enforcement

Oxford University Press (OUP) has announced the launch of a new 2013 title: Journal of Antitrust Enforcement (JAE).




18 September 2012

The mathematics of democracy: Who should vote?

Joseph C. McMurray discusses the interesting, if somewhat uncommon, mathematical lens through which to view politics on the OUPblog.




17 September 2012

Oxford University Press title joins new model for open access publishing

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce that Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (PTEP) has been identified for participation in SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics), a new collaborative initiative for open access (OA) publishing in high-energy physics, which aims to convert the literature of the field to open access by redirecting subscriptions fees to directly pay for the publishing services, in a way transparent to authors.




12 September 2012

Results from world’s first registry of pregnancy and heart disease reveals important differences between countries and heart conditions

Results from the world’s first registry of pregnancy and heart disease have shown that most women with heart disease can go through pregnancy and delivery safely, so long as they are adequately evaluated, counselled and receive high quality care. The findings are published online today in the European Heart Journal




11 September 2012

MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States joins Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce a publishing partnership with the Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States to publish their quarterly journal, MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States.




6 September 2012

Oxford University Press and the German Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property announce new publication partnership

Oxford University Press (OUP) and the German Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property (GRUR) are very pleased to announce a new partnership between the Journal of Intellectual Property Law and Practice (JIPLP) and Gewerblicher Rechtsschutz und Urheberrecht, Internationaler Teil (GRUR Int.), a publication of the GRUR.




5 September 2012

"Fitness and fatness": not all obese people have the same prognosis

People can be obese but metabolically healthy and fit, with no greater risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease or cancer than normal weight people, according to the largest study ever to have investigated this, which is published online in the European Heart Journal.




30 August 2012

Study finds increased risk of prematurity and low birth weight in babies born after three or more abortions

One of the largest studies to look at the effect of induced abortions on a subsequent first birth has found that women who have had three or more abortions have a higher risk of some adverse birth outcomes, such as delivering a baby prematurely and with a low birth weight. The new study is published today in the journal Human Reproduction.




28 August 2012

Oxford University Press acquires American Journal of Hypertension

Oxford University Press (OUP) today announced that the esteemed American Journal of Hypertension will be joining the publisher’s journal collection.




23 August 2012

Prestigious Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene journals join Oxford University Press

The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene’s two prestigious journals will join the Oxford University Press (OUP) collection in a new partnership announced between the organizations.




22 August 2012

Spouses of people suffering a heart attack need care for increased risk of depression and suicide

Spouses of people who suffer a sudden heart attack have an increased risk of depression, anxiety, or suicide after the event, even if their partner survives, according to new research in the European Heart Journal.




22 August 2012

Arne Kalleberg reflects on 90 years of Social Forces

Arne Kalleberg, the editor of Social Forces, reflects on the 90th anniversary of the journal and discusses the past, present and future of sociology on the OUPblog.




21 August 2012

Did we really want a National Health Service?

On the OUPblog, Nick Hayes writes on the public opinion of the National Health Service before it was created.




14 August 2012

Oxford University Press journal quality confirmed by new impact factors

The exceptional standards of Oxford University Press (OUP) journals has been confirmed with the release of the 2011 Journal Citation Reports© by Thomson Reuters. Over two-thirds of the titles in the publisher’s list have increased their impact factor since last year, attesting to OUP’s continued commitment to improving the quality of its journals.




9 August 2012

The American Journal of Jurisprudence joins Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce its recent acquisition of The American Journal of Jurisprudence (AJJ), which was previously self-published by the University of Notre Dame Law School.